Category Archives: Assistive Devices for Persons with Disabilities

TALKING CALCULATOR

TALKING CALCULATOR

 

Talking calculators are designed for blind and low vision users as well as second language learners. They announce the numbers and calculation results

in a clear voice. The Employers’ Federation of Ceylon ICT Training & Disability Resource Centre is equipped with talking calculators for the benefit of vision impaired persons.

 

Video:

 

Manique Gunaratne

Founder Members Team – South Asian Women with Disabilities Network

ANGEL PLAYER

Angel Player is a device specially designed for vision impaired persons which has the speech facility.

It has an e-book reader which reads text files, word files, pdf files and epub files. It has a music folder which plays all the mp3 files. The Daisy folder reads all the Daisy (Digital accessible information system) books. The video folder will play all the video files. The recorder is useful to record and play back any recorded file. It also has a radio and any radio programme can be recorded as wished. The Employers’ Federation of Ceylon ICT Training Centre for Persons with Disabilities and the Disability Resource Centre is equipped with an Angel Player.

 

Video:

 

 

Manique Gunaratne

Skype – manique.g

 

SIGNATURE GUIDE WITH BRAILLE

The signature guide assists vision impaired persons to place the signature at the correct place. The signature guide with Braille gives the opportunity for vision impaired persons to place the signature in Braille if needed.

 

Video:

 

Manique Gunaratne

Web: www.employers.lk

 

Small and large metal type signature guides for vision impaired persons

Small and large metal type signature guides for vision impaired persons

Vision impaired persons can use a commercial signature guide that is approximately the size of a credit card, made of plastic or metal and has a rectangular cutout in the middle.

This type of signature guide is available in rigid and flexible versions.

A friend or a family member can line up the signature guide with the writing line, which will allow the vision impaired person to sign the name independently in the writing space. If you have low vision, this type of signature guide is usually black or darker-colored and provides good contrast with white or light-colored

Paper.

You can also create your own signature guide. There are many ways to create your own signature guide:

Ask a family member or a friend to make a sharp crease in the paper along the writing space. This will provide a tactile raised writing line to help guide your signature placement.

Place 2-3 layered “Post-it” notes along the writing line to make it easier to locate and feel. Write your name just above the “Post-its” and remove them when you are done.

Ask a family member or a friend to place the upper edge of a credit card just below the writing line. This will provide a raised writing line to help guide your signature placement.

Use the index and middle fingers of your non-writing hand to form a “V.” Place your hand forming the “V” palms down and sideways on the paper so that your index finger is directly below the entire writing line and your middle finger is angled above the line. Sign your name above your index finger and stay inside the “V” to help guide your signature placement.

Ask a family member or friend to cut a rectangular opening in either an expired credit or debit card, a facsimile credit card that is frequently sent with card offers, or a piece of cardboard cut to the size of a credit card. The opening should be 1/2″ by approximately 3″. Use this template in the same way

You would use a commercial signature guide.

If you have low vision, ask a family member or friend to use a marker pen and darken the writing line for you. This will make the signature line easier for you to see.

Please note: Before you sign any important document, ask a trusted friend or family member to read it to you before you add your signature.

The Employers’ Federation of Ceylon ICT Training Centre for Persons with Disabilities is equipped with signature guides and many more assistive devices for persons with disabilities.

Video:

Manique Gunaratne

Vice Chair Person – South Asian Disability Forum

Three line signature guide

Three line signature guide

 

The three line signature guide assists vision impaired persons to place the signature in the correct place. When the signature guide is placed at the correct place in any line out of the three lines the vision impaired person can place the signature without any difficulty. Trainees of The Employers’ Federation of Ceylon ICT Training Centre for Persons with Disabilities make use of this assistive device.

 

Video:Three line signature guide

 

Manique Gunaratne

Blog: http://efcnetworkondisability.employers.lk/

Special chess board for vision impaired persons

Special chess board for vision impaired persons

 

The chess board specially designed for vision impaired persons allows a vision impaired person to play the game either with another vision impaired person or with a sighted person. The vision impaired person is allowed to touch and identify the pawns even the pawns of the opposite side player. The black squares are raised up in the board and white squares are pressed down. There is a Braille dot on top of white pawns. The black pawns do not have a Braille dot. The Employers’ Federation of Ceylon ICT Training Centre for Persons with Disabilities is equipped with this special chess board. Watch the video.

 

Video:special chess board

 

ManiqueGunaratne

The Employers’ Federation of Ceylon,

385 J3 Old Kotte Road,

Rajagiriya,

Sri Lanka.

NEEDLE THREADER FOR VISION IMPAIRED PERSONS

Needle threader for vision impaired persons

 

The needle threader is very useful for vision impaired persons to insert the thread into the needle. The vision impaired trainees at The Employers’ Federation of Ceylon ICT Training Centre has the privilege of using the needle threaders. Especially the vision impaired women.

 

Video:

Manique N.T. VTS_01_1

 

ManiqueGunaratne

Founder Members Team – South Asian Women with Disabilities Network