OUT OF THE SHADOWS

Law & Society Trust, together with researchers from

the Institute for Culture and Society at Western

Sydney University, have collaborated in an innovative

report documenting the stories of hardship and

resilience of Sri Lankan women with disabilities living

in war affected areas.

Women with disabilities and advocates of their rights

were active participants in directing the course of

this project, assisting researchers to shape and

develop the final report recommendations as a starting

point for a social, cultural and legal transformation to

achieve the aspirations of women with disabilities in

Sri Lanka, who have thus far received minimal

recognition in the domestic context.

The official launch of the Law & Society Trust, and Western Sydney University’s collaborative report: ‘OUT OF THE SHADOWS’ A STUDY OF WAR AFFECTED WOMEN

WITH DISABILITIES IN SRI LANKA was held at the Sri Lanka Foundation in July 2018. Ms. Manique Gunaratne and Ms. Ayasana Gunasekera from The Employers’ Federation of Ceylon ICT Training & Disability Resource Centre Joined to hear from the Human Rights Commission of Sri Lanka in response to the findings and recommendations

presented.

Law & Society Trust is a not-for-profit organisation

engaged in human rights documentation, legal

research, and advocacy in Sri Lanka.

The Institute for Culture and Society researches

transformations in culture and society in the context

of contemporary global change. It champions

collaborative engaged research in the humanities

and social sciences for a globalizing digital age.

 

Manique Gunaratne

Manager – Specialise Training and Disability Resource Centre of The Employers’ Federation of Ceylon

FINGER READER

Singapore University of Technology & Design, University of Moratuwa, Dialog and The Emplloyers’ Federation of Ceylon ICT Training & Disability Resource Centre developed the Finger Reader device. Vision impaired ICT trainees of The Employerss’ Federation of Ceylon assisted to further develop this app with their valuable inputs for the research. The research was done in April and May 2018 at the EFC.

FingerReader aims to create an assistive device that sustainably change how the visually impaired community can independently access information on the go. Accessing visual information in a mobile context is a major challenge for the blind.

Designed and developed by the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD), the FingerReader empowers the communities who would otherwise have no access to assistive technology because they were either too expensive or did not fulfill the user expectations.

Engagements with blind people reveal numerous difficulties with existing state-of-the-art technologies including problems with accuracy, mobility, efficiency, cost, and more importantly social exclusion. The design of FingerReader address these challenges as it is a finger-worn accessory that allows users to simply point at products, restaurant menus, signs etc. to perform a recognition and interpretation task on what the FingerReader sees and hear the result spoken to him or her through a headset.

Dialog joined hands with SUTD to deploy FingerReader devices in Sri Lanka to support Sri Lanka’s visually impaired community.

The expert team members are Prof. Suranga Nanayakkara, Mr. Roger Boldu and Mr. Haimo Zhang.

 

Picture descriptions for vision impaired persons:

1 Manique speaking.

2 Manique with Tharaka and Peniel from University of Moratuwa.

3 Vision impaired trainees doing the research.

4 Research team from University of Moratuwa and EFC trainees.

5 Tharidu with the supporting team from Dialog.

Manique Gunaratne

Executive Committee Member – Disability Organisations’ Joint Front

ACCESS AUDITS

 

We are all persons with disabilities at some time in our lives. A child, a person with a broken leg, a parent with a pram, pregnant mother, an elderly person, etc. are all disabled in one way or another. Those who remain healthy and able-bodied all their lives are few. As far as the built-up environment is concerned, it is important that it should be barrier-free And adapted to fulfill the needs of all people equally. As a matter of fact, the needs of the persons with disabilities coincide with the needs of the majority, and all

People are at ease with them. As such, planning for the majority implies planning for people with varying abilities and disabilities.

The technical aim of an access audit is to give recommendations to provide a barrier-free Environment for the independence, convenience and safety of all people with disabilities and persons with not yet with a disability. The Employers’ Federation of Ceylon, Specialized Training & Disability Resource Centre conducted an access audit to give recommendations to London Stock Exchange Colombo 4 office in June 2018 to make their premises a barrier free environment for persons with disabilities. The audit was conducted by Ms. Manique Gunaratne, Ms. Ayasana Gunasekera and Mr. Santhush Peiris.

 

Picture descriptions for vision impaired persons:

Group of auditors.

(Honoured, Deshabandu) Ms. H.K. Manique Gunaratne

MAKE YOUR ORGANIZATION A FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES, WITH A JUST A LITTLE REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION

People who live with disabilities often face fear, discomfort, and hostility at a rate that far exceeds that encountered by those who do have no disability.

The vast majority of such treatment is rooted in a basic lack of understanding about the challenges that come with having a disability, and the experience

Of sharing the world with people who do not. People often seek to fill in gaps in their knowledge, and when information is lacking, confusion and even

Fear may result.

 

Anyone wishing to overcome this experience in them will be best served by first recognizing that a disability is a limited phenomenon. A physical

Disability may have a large impact on how an individual interacts with the physical word. A sensory disability may alter the gathering of information.

These are conditions however; in no way prevent the individuals who live with them from having unique personalities, talents, knowledge, humor, and lives.

People who live with disabilities have more in common than not with those who have no disability. We all share the same existence, and the same basic needs.

 

In other cases, people who are living with a disability

May have feelings about language that is not in keeping with the established guidelines for etiquette. Whatever the reason, the commonly recognized best

Practices of disability-related etiquette may not always be the preferred practices, and it is always most important for the most effective and respectful

Communication.

We are all persons with disabilities at some time in our lives. A child, a person with a broken leg, a parent with a pram, pregnant mother, an elderly person, etc. are all disabled in one way or another. Those who remain healthy and able-bodied all their lives are few. As far as the built-up environment is concerned, it is important that it should be barrier-free And adapted to fulfill the needs of all people equally. As a matter of fact, the needs of the persons with disabilities coincide with the needs of the majority, and all

People are at ease with them. As such, planning for the majority implies planning for people with varying abilities and disabilities.

 

The technical aim of these programmes are to provide a barrier-free

Environment for the independence, convenience and safety of all people with disabilities and persons with not yet with a disability.

 

Disability etiquettes and accessibility has been a huge challenge for people with disabilities. This includes customers as well as employees. Therefore, it is important Employers to sensitize your staff on disability etiquettes and on accessibility. Please make sure that at least few staff members are sensitized on above matter to treat your customers with dignity and justice.

 

Therefore, we are in a position to do the following programmes at your premises to teach disability etiquette, Access audits, reasonable accommodation the right way to handle persons with disabilities and also train them in accessibility measures for the workplace.

 

Ms. Manique Gunaratne of The Employers’ Federation of Ceylon, Specialised Training & Disability Resource Centre together with Ms. Ayasana Gunasekera, Mr. Santhush Peris and Mr. Chamod Nayanananda  recently conducted all above programmes at a leading bank in Sri Lanka in June 2018 to make a disabled friendly environment with dignity and justice for all.

 

Picture descriptions for vision impaired persons:

Manique, Ayasana, Santhush and Chamod.

Manique Gunaratne

Viber: 0094779571918

OFFICE AND TABLE ETIQUETTES FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

The Employers’ Federation of Ceylon Specialised Training & Disability Resource Centre is conducting Soft Skills training for persons with diverse disabilities (persons with vision impairment, persons with hearing impairment, persons with speech difficulties, slow learners, persons with physical disabilities, wheel chair users and partially sighted persons). The module on Office and table etiquettes was conducted by Jetwing Hotels at Jetwing Blue Hotel in Negombo in June 2018. Persons with disabilities got the opportunity to learn the proper method of dining etiquettes.

 

Picture descriptions for vision impaired persons:

1 At the beach.

2 Sign language interpretations.

3 Chandima thanking the trainers.

4 Training on how to have a 3 course meal.

5 Group photograph.

6 Training on office etiquettes.

7 Having the main meal.

8 Training on dining etiquettes.

9 Journey to Jetwing Blue Hotel.

 

10 Manique presenting.

11 Briefing by the hotel for the participants.

Manique Gunaratne

Blog: http://efcnetworkondisability.employers.lk/

ACCESS AUDITS

We are all persons with disabilities at some time in our lives. A child, a person with a broken leg, a parent with a pram, pregnant mother, an elderly person, etc. are all disabled in one way or another. Those who remain healthy and able-bodied all their lives are few. As far as the built-up environment is concerned, it is important that it should be barrier-free And adapted to fulfill the needs of all people equally. As a matter of fact, the needs of the persons with disabilities coincide with the needs of the majority, and all

People are at ease with them. As such, planning for the majority implies planning for people with varying abilities and disabilities.

The technical aim of an access audit is to give recommendations to provide a barrier-free Environment for the independence, convenience and safety of all people with disabilities and persons with not yet with a disability. The Employers’ Federation of Ceylon, Specialized Training & Disability Resource Centre conducted an access audit to give recommendations to Diesel & Motor Engineering PLC in April 2018 to make their premises a barrier free environment for persons with disabilities. The audit was conducted by Ms. Manique Gunaratne, Ms. Ayasana Gunasekera, Mr. Santhush Peiris and Mr. Chamod Nayanananda.

 

Picture descriptions for vision impaired persons:

Group of auditors.

Manique Gunaratne

Skype – manique.g

DISABILITY ETIQUETTES

People who live with disabilities often face fear, discomfort, and hostility at a rate that far exceeds that encountered by those who do have no disability.

The vast majority of such treatment is rooted in a basic lack of understanding about the challenges that come with having a disability, and the experience

Of sharing the world with people who do not. People often seek to fill in gaps in their knowledge, and when information is lacking, confusion and even

Fear may result.

Anyone wishing to overcome this experience in them will be best served by first recognizing that a disability is a limited phenomenon. A physical

Disability may have a large impact on how an individual interacts with the physical word. A sensory disability may alter the gathering of information.

These are conditions however; in no way prevent the individuals who live with them from having unique personalities, talents, knowledge, humor, and lives.

People who live with disabilities have more in common than not with those who have no disability. We all share the same existence, and the same basic needs.

In other cases, people who are living with a disability

May have feelings about language that is not in keeping with the established guidelines for etiquette. Whatever the reason, the commonly recognized best

Practices of disability-related etiquette may not always be the preferred practices, and it is always most important for the most effective and respectful

Communication.

Ms. Manique Gunaratne supported by Ms. Ayasana Gunasekera of The Employers’ Federation of Ceylon, Specialised Training & Disability Resource Centre trained the staff members of London Stock Exchange in “Disability Etiquettes” in June 2018.

 

Picture descriptions for vision impaired persons:

1 Manique conducting the session.

2 Participants.

Manique Gunaratne

Web: www.employers.lk